Behind the BarThe Tasting Room: Ginbrew (@ginbrew)

In an era of craft cocktails and a pre-prohibition style of mixology, Ginbrew gives you the tools and necessities to make one of the world’s oldest concoctions known to man… gin. Well, to be a little more specific… compound gin. You see, Ginbrew gives you the herbs, the mason jar and the instructions. You just buy the vodka, add the ingredients and infuse it for 7 days. What’s the difference between compound gin and regular...
Mike Ginn Mike GinnNovember 29, 20148 min

In an era of craft cocktails and a pre-prohibition style of mixology, Ginbrew gives you the tools and necessities to make one of the world’s oldest concoctions known to man… gin. Well, to be a little more specific… compound gin. You see, Ginbrew gives you the herbs, the mason jar and the instructions. You just buy the vodka, add the ingredients and infuse it for 7 days.

What’s the difference between compound gin and regular off the shelf gin? Compound gin is something you would see before the final distillation of the product. It’s brown for the infusion of herbs and the off the shelf clear gin is almost the same except it is distilled one more time to make it clear. While vodka and gin have some small differences, the premise is the same. Thus, by infusing vodka with herbs and berries for 7 days you have compound gin.

Simple right? That’s exactly what Ginbrew makes it. They provide 3 different formulas for you to play with and create. A mason jar to infuse in and a cheesecloth for you to strain your product in and out of the jar. After 7 days you strain it out of the jar into another container and then enjoy! We strained it out, cleaned out the jar and then returned it to the jar for a better presentation.

Our review:

We started our infusion on November 18, 2014. The instructions asked us to use a low to medium priced vodka to prove the quality of their product could make it still a premium experience so we chose a 750ml bottle of Three Olives Vodka. Out of the 3 choices (Blue Ruin, Liberty 13 and Jenevieve), we chose to try the Blue Ruin first. We did as the instructions asked and shook it every couple of days and stored it in a dark room temperature spot. After 7 days (November 26th actually, so 8 days) we removed it from the jar by straining it in a different container and then cleaned the jar and returned it to the jar. The result… Fantastic. The Blue Ruin gave the gin a nice floral but somewhat dry taste. It was easy to drink both on the rocks and mixed in a Negroni. We also sampled it with lemonade just because and it actually stood out a little more than we would have liked but still a very solid tasting and very good tasting compound gin.

Our suggestion, head over to GinBrew.com and grab a kit for $25 to try at home yourself. Next up we plan on trying the Liberty 13.

Here are some classic recipes to try with your Gin Brew at home:

Negroni

Ingredients:

  • 1 oz gin
  • 1 oz Campari
  • 1 oz Sweet Vermouth
  • 2 Dashes Orange Bitters
  • ice
  • Orange Zest

Tools and Glassware:

  • Old Fashioned Glass
  • Mixing Glass
  • Strainer
  • Stirring Spoon

How to prepare the drink:

The Negroni is a very easy drink to prepare. Take all of the ingredients and add them to a mixing glass, add ice and stir until the drink is diluted about 20% or around 2 minutes. After, strain the ingredients over fresh ice in an old fashioned cocktail glass. Next, zest the rim of the glass with an orange peel and drop it in the glass. That’s it. Done. Enjoy!

Aviation

Ingredients:

  • 2 oz – Gin
  • 1 oz – Fresh Lemon Juice
  • 1/2 oz – Maraschino Liqueur
  • 1/4 oz – Violet Liqueur
  • Brandied Cherry

Tools and Glassware:

  • Martini Glass or Cocktail Glass
  • Double Strainer
  • Shaker
  • Strainer

How to prepare the drink:

First, fill a shaker with a 1 ounce pour of Lemon Juice, 1/2 ounce of Maraschino Liqueur, and lastly a 2 ounce pour of gin. Shake all of the ingredients for 20-30 seconds. Once shaken, place a brandied cherry into a martini or cocktail glass then double strain the cocktail ingredients into the glass. Then slowly drizzle 1/4 ounce of Violet Liqueur in the middle for color effect as well as a touch of floral aroma and sweetness. That’s it. Stop. You are finished.

Mike Ginn

Mike Ginn

Husband, father, craft bartender, writer and content creator.

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